“Dripping”

Dripping is a new trend among teens who use e-cigarettes.  In order to get a thicker vapor cloud and produce stronger flavors, users of e-cigs will apply a few drips of the liquid directly to the heating coil.  A study shows that 1 in 4 users use this technique. And the below expert from an article on CNN.com discusses the dangers of this activity…

The article, which can be seen here, states the following:

“Dripping generates higher heating coil temperatures than conventional use of e-cigarettes — and this is a safety concern. “Higher temperatures lead to greater emissions of a class of harmful chemicals known as volatile aldehydes,” including formaldehyde and acrolein, Shihadeh said.

According to Dr. David Carpenter, director of the University at Albany’s School of Public Health, both formaldehyde and acrolein are known to cause cancer in humans. Carpenter is unaffiliated with the new study.
These chemicals are also associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, a progressive disease that makes it difficult to breathe.
In an unrelated study last year, Shihadeh and his colleagues approximated realistic dripping scenarios under laboratory conditions and then measured temperatures and emissions. “The aldehyde emissions were much greater than what we measured using conventional e-cigs,” he said.
More important, as puffing progresses and liquid is consumed, the temperatures and emissions rise “drastically,” Shihadeh said. Users believe they can detect when conditions have shifted by a change in flavor, he explained, but by the time they “taste the difference, they very likely have already been exposed to much higher levels of these toxicants” than would have happened under conventional e-cig use.
According to Krishnan-Sarin, “Emerging data is also showing that e-cigarettes contain many other chemicals like propylene glycol and glycerine, and they also contain a lot of flavor chemicals. Now, all of these are volatile, and when they are heated at high temperatures like we see with dripping, you could produce high levels of carcinogenic compounds.
“If the e-liquid is vaporized at a high temperature, you could get a big shot of nicotine,” Krishnan-Sarin said.
However, inhaling toxic chemicals is not the only safety risk.
“Handling liquid so often, there is a greater risk of incidental skin contact,” Shihadeh said. E-cigarette liquids typically contain nicotine, which is absorbed rapidly through human skin.
If enough liquid is spilled, then, a vaper could be exposed to toxic levels of nicotine. Shihadeh also suggested young children might be hurt by spilled liquid. An analysis of calls to the National Poison Data System estimated that more than seven young children accidentally ingest e-liquids left within reach in households each day.”
Link:
2017-02-07T09:29:15+00:00February 7th, 2017|

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